The Comprehensive Thyroid Profile

Symptoms of hypothyroidism (low levels of thyroid hormone) include fatigue, cold and heat intolerance, hypotension, fluid retention, dry skin and/or hair, constipation, headaches, low sexual desire, infertility, irregular menstrual periods, aching muscles and joints, depression, apathy, anxiety, slowed metabolism and decreased heart rate, memory and concentration impairment, enlarged tongue, deep voice, swollen neck, PMS, weight gain, hypoglycemia, and high cholesterol and triglycerides. Yet, more than half of all people with thyroid disease are unaware of their condition.

Although both T4 (thyroxin, an inactive form that is converted to T3 in other areas of the body) and T3 (triiodothyronine, the active form) are secreted by the normal thyroid gland, many hypothyroid patients are treated only with levothyroxine (synthetic T4). Some hypothyroid patients remain symptomatic, and T3 may also be required for optimal thyroid replacement therapy. However, the only commercially available form of T3 is synthetic liothyronine sodium in an immediate release formulation which is rapidly absorbed, and may result in higher than normal T3 concentrations throughout the body causing serious side effects, including heart palpitations. Research indicates, there is a need for sustained-release T3 preparations to avoid adverse effects.

Common symptoms from thyroid disease are:

  • thinning outer 1/3 of eyebrows
  • cold hands and feet
  • dark circles around the eyes
  • puffy eyes
  • hoarseness or voice changes
  • dry skin
  • constipation
  • lack of energy, fatigue, brain fog
  • muscle aches
  • tired all day or energy increases as the day progresses
  • weight gain, especially lower torso
  • depression, memory loss, anxiety, insomnia
  • thinning hair
  • irregular periods
  • premenstrual syndrome
  • infertility

Thyroid disease or dysfunction can explain a wide variety of symptoms, yet it is notoriously under diagnosed. 10% of Americans may have thyroid dysfunction. Thyroid hormones are the most important of all other hormones.

Other symptoms of thyroid dysfunction are:

  • weight gain or loss
  • apathy
  • sleepiness (especially at rest)
  • sometimes compensatory hyperactivity
  • memory problems
  • concentration problems
  • slow thinking
  • morning depression (and at rest)
  • irritability
  • nervousness
  • hypercholesterolemia
  • premature atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease
  • PMS
  • hyperinsulinemia
  • fibrocystic breast disease
  • paresthesias
  • acne
  • allergies
  • loss of outer 1/3 of eyebrows
  • hair loss in the front and back of the head, loss of hair in legs, axilla, arms
  • poor night vision
  • loss of eyelashes
  • ear canal becomes itchy, dry, and scaly; excess formation of cerumen
  • anemia
  • tinnitus
  • mental disorders
  • dizziness/vertigo
  • heart failure
  • arrhythmias
  • increased risk of developing asthma
  • elevation of liver enzymes
  • gallstones
  • bladder and kidney infections
  • eating disorders
  • excessive menstrual bleeding
  • recurrent miscarriage
  • urination at night
  • easy bruising
  • erectile dysfunction
  • low blood sugar
  • osteoporosis
  • muscle and joint pain
  • infertility
  • irregular bowel habits
  • sleep disturbances
  • menstrual irregularities
  • dry/brittle, sparse, coarse hair and nails
  • heat or cold intolerance
  • fatigue
  • hair loss
  • water retention
  • depression
  • hyperlipidemia
  • constipation
  • headaches (especially diffuse)/migraine headaches
  • rough, dry skin
  • poor circulation
  • elbow keratosis
  • slow speech
  • anxiety/panic attacks
  • decreased memory
  • inability to concentrate
  • reduced heart rate
  • slow movements
  • morning stiffness
  • puffy face
  • swollen eyelids
  • decreased sexual interest
  • cold hands and feet
  • swollen legs, feet, hands, abdomen
  • horse, husky voice
  • low body temperature
  • low blood pressure
  • muscle weakness/stiffness
  • agitation/irritability
  • dull facial expression
  • yellowish discoloration of the skin
  • muscle cramps
  • drooping eyelids
  • carpal tunnel syndrome
  • sleep apnea
  • diastolic hypertension
  • endothelial dysfunction
  • elevated CRP and homocysteine
  • hearing loss
  • endometriosis

Tests included in this profile are:

  • TSH-Thyroid Stimulating Hormone, which is produced by the pituitary and acts on thyroid to stimulate production of T4
  • Free T4-Thyroxine, the predominant hormone produced by the thyroid gland. It is an inactive hormone that converts to T3 within cells
  • Free T3-Triiodothyronine; active thyroid hormone that regulates the metabolic activity of cells
  • reverse T3. This T3 isomer, not biologically active, blocks receptors of T3 (actions of T3), producing symptoms of hypothyroidism
  • TPO-Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies is an enzyme used by the thyroid gland in the manufacture of T4
  • Antithyroglobulin antibody-blocks functions of thyroid hormones
  • AMA- antimicrosomal antibody, lowers production of thyroid hormone
  • plus, possibly, 24 hour urine collection for iodine

The Comprehensive Thyroid Profile combines the four most clinically useful function tests, giving a thorough assessment of a patient's thyroid function compared with monitoring TSH alone. Since hormonal symptoms commonly mimic each other, this assessment allows for a true evaluation of a patient's hormonal disorders.


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Marek Gawrysz, MD

Marek Gawrysz, MD

I earned my medical degree from the Medical Academy in Krakow (Collegium Medicum of the Jagiellonian University), Poland in 1978. My training requirements were fulfilled at the Medical Academy in Krakow, Poland, Swedish Covenant Hospital and Columbus-Cuneo-Cabrini Medical Center in Chicago. I am board certified and have dual fellowship (extra training) in Family Practice and Anti-aging, Regenerative and Functional Medicine.

I am practicing medicine for 35 years.

I am also a recipient of 2012, 2011 and 2010 People's Choice, Most Compassionate Doctor 2011, and 2003 Physician of the Year awards.

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American Academy of Anti-Aging MedicineFellowship in Anti-Aging, Regenerative & Functional MedicineAmerican Academy of Family PhysiciansAmerican Board of Physician SpecialtiesJagiellonian UniversityPolish-American Medical Society
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